Friday, 3 May 2013

Promise me something ...

If I mention any new book I'm working on, please check if I've done a synopsis and if I haven't nag me until I have. Getting one written quickly for the Kobo/Jeffrey Archer/Curtis Brown competition was tough. It's been received now and is being considered along with two more. Even if I don't win I'm glad I've done it as getting the plot down to one page really shows up the strengths and weaknesses and will be a great help to keep me on track as I continue writing. I intend to always do a draft synopsis at an early stage in future.

If telling a whole novel on a page sounds tough, how about doing it in a tweet? I had to for this interview (leave a comment to be in with a chance of winning an ecopy of A Year and a Day)

Here's a chance to get a professional director and have your play performed. Among the things you can write about are 'riotous mixture of something'. D'you reckon my garden would count?



60 comments:

  1. Synopses....aaaaagh!

    But your garden looks wonderful!

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    1. I'm very pleased with the garden at the moment, Frances.

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  2. Ditto what Frances said :-) I'm off to read your interview now x

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  3. I've heard about Twitter pitches. Since the 'logline' is easier than that synopsis for me, I could actually do that one.

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    1. Almost anything is easier than a synopsis, Alex! (well anything to do with novel writing anyway)

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  4. Hi Patsy .. that's great - well done for getting so much writing out there and into competitions -

    Love the garden .. the colours and greens are really bursting forth right now ..

    Cheers and have a great long weekend .. Hilary

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    1. Bursting is right, Hilary. Now the sun is shining the plants seem to be making up for the slow start.

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  5. Beautiful garden, Patsy. I had to teach my Year sixes how to write a synopsis when I was still teaching but I'm blowed if I'd be able to write a good one myself.

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    1. I'm not so sure I've written a good one, Wendy - but at least I've written one.

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  6. Synopsis can be tricky things! Love those flowers so colourful :)

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    1. Tricky wasn't the word I used when writing the dratted thing, Suzanne.

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  7. Wow, your garden is spectacular!! Interesting thing about synops. If I have a new idea for a story, my agent wants a synop up front. One so she can tell me whether or not she's interested and two, I think, so I have a well-fleshed idea. I just started a new idea and the synop is the first thing I'm working on.

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    1. Sounds as though your agent is very sensible!

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    1. Funny, seems quite a few writers prefer looking at pretty flowers to writing a synopsis, Linda.

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  9. Great pics of the garden. If they are this year's, the season is well ahead of us.

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    1. I took the pictures this morning, L. I do live right on the south coast and the garden is quite sheltered.

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  10. I always look forward to your garden pictures, Patsy - they remind me of home.

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    1. Glad you like them, Lizy. (Did you see the comp for you in my last post?)

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  11. Wonderful garden pictures, you must want to sit and admire it more. Loved your story about the shop on the corner in WW fiction special. Sounded like ours a bit. Busy job hunting now, it's a cross between a nightmare and a scream. I'm also getting my novel done on the mad off-chance any agent or publisher will love it and say 'where have you been all our life write some more....'

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    1. I hope a publisher does say that, Suzy. In the meantime good luck with the job hunting.

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  12. What beautiful flowers! And congratulations on getting your synopsis done and accepted! But a synopsis in a tweet....ah no, too hard!

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    1. It's not accepted, Edith - just being judged for the competition. I do feel it's an achievement to have finished it though.

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  13. I can't imagine ever being able to summarize a novel in a tweet, since one-page synopses alone are so frustrating to write!

    Your garden looks so pretty, btw! :)

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    1. I didn't think I'd be able to do it until I tried, Heather.

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  14. Good Luck with the competition, Patsy. I hope you get to enjoy the weekend in your beautiful garden now that the synopsis is done . I love the photos. I'm working on my first novel so haven't had to do a synopsis as yet although I have started to think about it. I suspect the problem will be that I know too much about what's happened in the book, and the irrelevant parts that didn't go in, so a lot to be creatively told and sold in one page. It doesn't sound an easy job.

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    1. It's not easy, Sharon. I think you're right that it's hard when we know too much - which is why I'm hoping that doing it earlier will be slightly easier.

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  15. Good luck with that competition, and thank you for sharing those gorgeous pictures.

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  16. Best of luck with the comp, Patsy! Beautiful pics, too. And thanks for stopping by my blog! New follower here :)

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  17. Good luck with the Jeffrey Archer competition Patsy. Love to hear how it turns out for you.

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    1. I will report on the results, I promise.

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  18. I like your riotous garden! Left a comment on the other blog - impressed at the tweet summing up!

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  19. Ugh! Synopsis, a bad word. But necessary, and understandably so...
    Well done you on getting one prepared quickly.

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    1. I know we need them and do see why, but 'ugh' is right.

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  20. The synopsis is always the last thing I write, because I never know quite how my story is going to go. Best of luck!

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    1. Yes, a story can change as we write it, Annalisa. If I feel mine needs to deviate from the synopsis then I'll let it ... and then end up writing another synopsis I suppose.

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  21. Good luck, Patsy. I would rather write a whole book with a blooded finger instead of a pen than a synopsis. Just had to write one for the follow up to Hell To Pay and it was a nightmare!

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    1. You're not keen on doing them then, Jennifer? ;-)

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  22. Should have said, Patsy, but it's amazing that you've made the final 3. Brilliant in fact. Well done. I have my fingers and everything else crossed for you.

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  23. Now I know why I find it so hard to write a synopsis of the monthly reading book for our reading group without giving away the plot and the ending. Love the flowers in your garden.

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    1. In this case I did have to give away the plot and ending - I think trying to give the flavour of the whole story without doing that would be even harder, Maggie.

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  24. Hey Miss Patsy. Been awhile since I have been this way. I will stop in more often, your pics are great and I hope you beat that cover off those other books! Happy Monday!

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  25. I also found that writing a synopsis does point out some weaknesses, but sadly its scope isn't big enough for the stories I write, so it can't show me all the issues. :-)

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    1. Hopefully getting the framework right helps sort out the rest though, Misha.

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  26. Gaaah. I hate synopses. But I love your garden! :)

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    1. They're rotten things to write, aren't they, Linda?

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  27. Reading about synopses this late at is bound to give me nightmares! lol. Wow your garden looks fab. :-)

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    1. I hope the flowers distracted you from the terror, Wendy.

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  28. Promise something...

    Something or nothing, but as long as it's not just an empty one.

    Twitter has been very good for my editing skills, too.

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  29. Twitter is good for identifying unnecessary words, isn't it, JJ?

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Thanks so much for commenting!