Wednesday, 26 June 2013

Antidisestablishmentarianism

So how's that for the word of the week? It's one of those words that makes my head hurt if I try to explain it, so I'm not going to bother. I think it may contain a double negative.

I'm rather proud of the fact that I managed to work antidisestablishmentarianism into a story though. As I've done that already your challenge is to casually drop it into a conversation. Please report back when you have, I'd love to know how it went.



33 comments:

  1. "...a fox eating the remains of a pasty." You have to be careful typing that - could be painful.

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    1. My first thought too, Robert!

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    2. A typo there might have caused alarm amongst my nearest and dearest. I assure you that, other than a few scraps, it didn't eat anything of mine.

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  2. That word (I shan't begin to try typing it) seems to have only one use, and that, of course, is its claim to,fame as the longest word in our language. All my grandchildren know it, but none knows what it means. I do know what it means, but have never yet found a use for it. Has anyone?

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    1. It was useful in sparking a story idea, Frances but no, I've never had a situation where I've felt inclined to use it properly.

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  3. Ha! I remember how proud I was when I learned to spell the longest word in the English language. I've never had occasion to work it into a conversation, though, except to point out that interesting fact about it.

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    1. I confess I had to check the spelling to be sure I had it right, Linda.

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  4. That's one of my favorite words to use! Drives my wife nuts because she still can't say it correctly.

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  5. I try to learn new and longer words all the time.

    Nas

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  6. wow! that's a word and a half, my eldest has a party to go to later. I'm sure I'll be able to drop it in to a conversation somewhere...
    Then again maybe I'll just share it with my eldest I know he'll love it's claim to fame as the longest word in our language.:-)

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    1. I hope he likes it - and does manage to drop it into the conversation.

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  7. I thought for a minute it said he was eating a patsy.
    If you are anti 'dis', does that mean you are for establishmentarianism? Duh!

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    1. That's why it makes my head hurt, Grail.

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  8. I know what it means, and what it relates to! I had a great history teacher and one day this was on the blackboard waiting for us.

    In the 19th century there was a political movement in England to remove the Anglican church as the established church of England, ie. to disestablish it. The anti- people were against such a move. Therefore, Gail just above me, is in fact correct :-)

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    1. Thanks, Annalisa. I knew it meant to be against those who wish to disestablish something, but not that it referred to a particular group of disestablishers.

      Gosh this blog is educational.

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  9. Wow, "antidisestablishmentarianism" is such a lengthy word. Kudos to you for finding a way to include it in a story!

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    1. I was jolly pleased with myself, Heather.

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  10. Hi Patsy!

    Great word choice! I love it!!! It's words like these that allow you to have so much fun with our language (and with unsuspecting victims!!). I dropped it into a conversation with a friend talking about religion and politics. They were like, "whaaaaat?' Made me feel very smart ;) Well only for a second before I couldn't really explain what it meant. After researching, doesn't it just mean the people who were against the separation of church and state?? Guess I should have done better research before the conversation... Live and learn!

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    1. Well done for dropping it into the conversation, Christi - I'm sure you'll manage it again more successfully next time.

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  11. Sorry Patsy I can't even say this word let alone drop into a sentence! Hope Franz was eating a genuine Cornish pasty.

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    1. Sadly not, Tracy - but with luck I will be soon as we're currently in that part of the world.

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  12. Oh I see, anti-dis, I thought it was reggae talk, like ya knooww wo a meeen dis and dat,? No, I think I'll go and read your book instead Patsy, it arrived today. Franz seems to be unaware that you're so close. Now a writing retreat with a fox. That's rare.

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    1. I reckon it would work well in a reggae song, Suzy. If I was in any way musical I'd be tempted to try it.

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  13. Antidisestablishmentarianism? Use it all the time. It's the noun that describes being against the disbanding of the establishment, innit?

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    1. Yeah, like I fink that's summat like right.

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  14. That used to be my daughter's favourite word when she was wee - she picked it up from an episode of Arthur (animated series of the books my Marc Brown). Although I don't think she managed to use it in a story of her own.

    x

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    1. Clearly stories are great for extending children's vocabulary, Suzanne.

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  15. Nice word choice. :) I don't blame you for not wanting to explain it. :) Have a good week, Patsy!

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Thanks so much for commenting!