Wednesday, 25 September 2013

Parbuckle

Parbuckle is ... what I get when I ask my husband for a word of the week suggestion. He reckons it's topical because it's been in the news (as a way of righting the partly submerged cruise ship Costa Concordia). A parbuckle is a rope or sling used to raise or lower casks or other cylindrical objects.

When used to right a ship, I suppose parbuckling is the opposite of careening. I used to talk about careening in my day job, but as I don't do it any more, I'll spare you the details. When not used in a nautical context careening means to swerve about.


Here's a picture of a ship which, sensibly, stayed away from the rocks and therefore remained the right way up. I careened (slowly) up a nearby mountain to take the photo.

That's two weeks this month I've done a double word of the week. I must get a grip.

30 comments:

  1. Love that word - and I love that picture, a sight for sore eyes on this misty morning :-) x

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  3. You need to parbuckle your thoughts and stop your ideas careening around your blog post, Patsy

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  4. We once had to careen Overlord, a 60-foot Bermudan sloop, on which I used to sail a lot. If my memory serves me right, we were in the Azores. The reason we careened the boat was to access a part of the hull which is normally underwater, in the region of the heads and I will spear you the rest of the details. Quite a sight though, to see such a large vessel almost on its side while tied up in port. We didn't use a parbuckle ...but I have seen one used to crane a motorboat out of the water for winter storage/refitting.
    We learn something (sometimes two things) new every day?

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    1. It's quite a tricky manoeuvre - ships have been lost that way, Anne. Your version doesn't sound a lot of fun.

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  5. Fun word! Never even knew it existed till now...

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  6. This ship looks as if it's careening to the right, or should that be starboard or something? It's not far from careering off course is it?

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    1. Does look a bit as though it's listing to starboard, Maggie but I think it's an optical illusion. It was waiting at anchor for me to come back (well, not just me!)

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  7. It may have missed the rocks but it didn't avoid trouble.

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  8. I had been thinking of entering that comp but haven't finished the particular novel yet! Haven't heard of this week's word, although I do know careening.

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    1. I don't have anything ready either, Rosemary. Maybe next year.

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  9. I loved hearing about the righting of the cruise ship and seeing the pictures. I've never heard of them doing that with a ship of that size. Very cool word - parbuckling! :-)

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    1. It's not something that's often needed now, Lexa.

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  10. This was just a sneaky way of using another of your honeymoon photos, wasn't it? Colour me green with envy.

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    1. Nooooo. OK, I sneakily used a holiday picture, but the honeymoon was a different trip. I do have pictures of that too.

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  11. Parbuckle sounds very Cornish and would go well in a gothic novel of smugglers parbuckling in the dark of midnight down cellars and caves I think.

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  12. You walking dictionary you! I am in AWE!! Yay! Take care
    x

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    1. I usually look 'em up, Kitty but I did know these.

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  13. Hi Patsy .. I hadn't heard of Parbuckle - and obviously I didn't pay that much attention to the righting of the Concordia - though am glad it's been done.

    I like Susan's idea of the Cornish connection .. but careening about is a good explanation of going round in small circles, something I've done a lot of recently trying to find my way to places!

    Cheers - and love the photo .. Hilary

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  14. I've been doing some striding off confidently in totally the wrong direction, Hilary. Wonder if there's a word for that.

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  15. Love the word, but have no chance to use it (though we did used to stay with friends on Giglio, where that ship went down).

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    1. I admit working it into everyday conversations might be a challenge - unless you're a person who buys rum by the barrel from cellars. I'm pretty sure that doesn't apply to you, Frances.

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Thanks so much for commenting!