Wednesday, 15 January 2014

Allude and Elude

To allude is to mention in a casual way or hint at. To elude is to escape from or avoid, or to fail be understood or achieved by. My writing friends have occasionally alluded to the times the correct word has eluded me.

I'm alluding to this opportunity to have your work performed on BBC radio, and this one to earn $50 in the hope the chances won't elude you.

Allusions and elusions are tricky to photograph, so here's something to give the illusion of spring.




28 comments:

  1. I wondered if you'd work in the word illusion! Nice photo.

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  2. Some allusions elude readers. ;)

    Lovely garden!

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  3. Allude, elude, allusions, elusions as well as illusion all present and correct!
    Love the Spring flowers.
    :-)

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    1. Thanks, Jan. Picture was taken in my garden a couple of years ago.

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  4. You always seem to know the words I struggle with, Patsy.

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    1. I confess that mixing these too prompted the post, Wendy. I knew the difference, but somehow typed the wrong one.

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  5. Beautiful flowers Patsy. It eludes me how your find time for so many things. I'll allude that you're a creative person, with an illustrious plot of bulbs. Thanks for the interesting links.

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  6. Allusion. Elusion. Illusion. I would have hope that the average person could grasp this except that so many still struggle with Too, To, and Two.

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    1. There, their and they're is another set that seems to be confused a lot more often than we'd expect, Robin. Perhaps over reliance on spell checker is an issue?

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  7. I always learn something new here!
    Thanks Patsy,

    Nas

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  8. There are so any similar words like this to trip writers up - the strange nature of the English language! Thanks for the links.

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  9. I don't think I've ever used either of those words, correctly or otherwise. I'll endeavour to use one of them today!

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    1. Hope you work them in somewhere, Annalisa.

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  10. For some reason I struggle with 'bare' and 'bear'. I alude whenever I can. Beautiful flowers.

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    1. I'm OK with teddy bear or bare firemen (for example) but not when it comes to something like 'she couldn't bare/bear it'. Both look wrong and i usually end up rephrasing it.

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  11. i like your tips! useful and fun!
    happy thursday!

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  12. I would never elude such a post.
    I love reviewing the meaning of words, even when I' m already familiar with them.
    The picture is gorgeous.
    Thank you.

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    1. Sometimes the ones we're fairly familiar with are the trickiest, Julia because we forget to check those.

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  13. i struggle with the difference between affect and effect, get it wrong every time. Thanks for the flash fiction tip, worth a go.

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    1. Those two are very easy to get wrong, I think, Tracy.

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Thanks so much for commenting!