Wednesday, 26 February 2014

I'm flagging

A flag, as I'm sure you know, is a piece of cloth used as a symbol of a country or organisation. Such flags can also be used to send messages or signals. You can flag up something for attention, or flag down a taxi.

Flat stones used for paving are sometimes known as flags. To flag is to become tired or less enthusiastic. Flag is also a type of iris.

Is there anything you can think of that I should have flagged, but didn't? Ah yes, another free to enter writing contest.

How about this one? You have to email the oraniser for an entry for. Three cash prizes are on offer, with £50 for first place. Stories up to 3,000 words are accepted.



18 comments:

  1. A wroting contest? Is there mud involved?!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ooops! Thanks for flagging that typo, Anne! I've fixed it now.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think you have "flag" about covered. I suppose you could bring color into it: waving the white flag for surrendering, or the red flag to provoke.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the colour of the flag makes a huge difference, Linda.

      Delete
  4. As an old football coach (American style) when the referee calls a penalty he throws his flag. The announcers then say that is the first or second or whatever the number of flags today. American Indians in my area (Wyoming) and the states surrounding often ate a root we call, sweet flag, it is awful, but evidently had some medicinal purposes – white men who tried it called it flag. Sometimes flag mint. Sorry we retired history teachers cannot help ourselves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't be sorry, Neil - that's interesting.

      Flags are involved in UK football too. I don't know why exactly, but they have them on the corners of the pitch. To me football is about as delightful as I imagine flag iris might taste!

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. Maybe they don't call them that round your way, Alex?

      Delete
  6. Flag tag is a short peptide sequence that is easily and specifically recognised by the anti flag tag antibody... Ha ha I have no life!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Easily recognised by someone other than me, Wendy!

      Delete
  7. We always called irises - the flowers, that is - 'flags'. Flagstones I believe are those cut from real rock rather than made of concrete. Nice hairdo, by the way!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you're right about the flagstones, Lizy. Concrete ones are more often called slabs.

      Delete
  8. The study of flags is called vexillology. That's my only contribution.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And a very good contribution it is too, Keith!

      Delete
  9. I'm flagging tonight myself, after an intense game of tennis. Well... intense for me. ;-)

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for commenting!