Monday, 9 June 2014

Far from the Madding Crowds.

This is the cottage where Thomas Hardy was born and later wrote Far from the Madding Crowd and Under The Greenwood Tree (my favourite so far)

Pictures of the lovely garden are here.
This is the living room where his mother taught him to read. He was a sickly child, so it was thought better for him to be encouraged academically rather than for him to join the family's building business.
 Music was a family tradition. Both his father and grandfather were good musicians. The songs they played feature in some of his novels.
This is a replica of his desk in the bedroom he shared with his brother and where he wrote several of his novels and poems.

His writing success freed Thomas of a life which would not have suited him and of the inferiority he felt due to his low social class.

If you can write about freedom you might like to try this competition (do read the t&cs first)


34 comments:

  1. Great to see the photos of Hardy's home from your latest travels, Patsy. Thanks.

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    1. It's well worth a visit if you're in the area, Carol.

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  2. I went there a few years ago; it's a beautiful place.

    Was Hardy the one who was so pale and still when he was born the midwife thought he was dead and dropped him unceremoniously in a bucket? I'm sure it was a famous writer of that era who got off to such a poor start in life.

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    1. I'd not heard the bit about the bucket, Dan but it does seem that he wasn't expected to survive into adulthood.

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    1. It was, Alex. We had a fascinating talk on his life too.

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    1. A real one - or this virtual one, R Mac?

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  5. I love getting to peek into a writer's home--thanks for sharing this. :)

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    1. I do too, Linda. Hubby says I'm nosey, but writers have to be interested in what's around them, right?

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  6. I should probably go there, since I don't live that far away and Hardy is one of my favourite authors. The Woodlanders is my favourite novel, though I enjoyed them all in different ways.

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    1. Do go, Hayley. I'm sure you'd enjoy it.

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  7. How lovely - I drive past so often I should call in .. cheers Hilary

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  8. That is so cool. It looks beautiful there.

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  9. The house looks amazing- particularly love the old violin. Thanks for posting the details of the comp - looks really interesting

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    1. Good luck if you try the competition, Vikki.

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  10. Neve read Ubdef the Greenwood Tree - I'm going to buy it.

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    1. Let me know what you think of it, Wendy.

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  11. Beautiful cottage - would love to see it one day. I've always liked Far from the Madding Crowd.

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  12. I could work in that cottage just as it is! and thanks for the comp news - I'm away from home for ten days soon and I should be able to write 500 words while I'm there.

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    1. I'm not sure I'd get much work done, Lizy. The garden would distract me.

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  13. Such a pretty cottage! And I must say I love seeing that such famous works had such humble beginnings. :-)

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    1. Proves big swanky offices, the latest tech and unlimited time with no interuptions aren't needed to write, doesn't it?

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  14. Thank you so much for sharing. Wonderful to see the place where such a great writer lived and worked. He was lucky in his parents too that they encouraged him academically on realising he was not cut out to join the family firm. Not all fathers in that day and age would have been so understanding maybe. What a wealth of literature would have been lost. Makes you think doesn't it!

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    1. It's true that not all families would have encouraged him in this way, Sue. Their support must have been a huge benefit - as is the support of family and friends of writers today.

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  15. Thank you, Patsy, it's lovely to see the cottage and place where Thomas Hardy wrote. I'm a great fan of his novels and poems :)

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    1. Glad you found it interesting, Sharon.

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  16. That's lovely, and imagine such a quaint cottage where all those mammoth novels came from. Must read some more of his stories.

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    1. I've not read them all yet, Suzy. It took me quite a while to 'discover' him.

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Thanks so much for commenting!