Wednesday, 9 July 2014

Making a plash

Plash can mean a pool or puddle, or a splashing sound. It's usually used in reference to water and I feel it suggests something gentle and refreshing. A fountain plashing water into a large basin where wearry tourists stop to rest. A beach being plashed by the tide. The sound of oars plashing into a sunlit river overhung with willows.

It's the kind of sound we'd enjoy hearing on a hot midsummer's day.

18 comments:

  1. I wonder when someone decided to add the s to make it splashing?

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    1. There's always someone wanting to 'add value and interest' Alex,

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  2. Angi Holden's Weekend Solstice poem uses the word plash perfectly. Must admit I had never heard of it and would have always used the obvious 'splash' instead.

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    1. I like plash - it has a gentler feel to it. I'll try to work it in somewhere.

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  3. I'd love to sit beside a plashing stream when the summer sun here is too hot for comfort!

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  4. Great to learn a new word, Patsy! :-) I must confess I haven't heard of 'plash' and its linked words.

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  5. I am convinced you have made this word up, Patsy! Did you use to watch Call My Bluff?

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    1. I didn't make it up, I promise. That's not to say I'm beyond such a trick!

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  6. It's good to know that's a real word. If I read that somewhere I'd just assume the person had made a typo and forgot the 's' at the beginning. =)

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  7. What a brilliant word - I'd never heard of it before! x

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  8. Young children always say plash and we supposedly wiser adults correct them to say splash.

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  9. I often think I'd love to plash in those fountains in the town centre.... I might one day.

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    1. I hope you get someone to take a photo, Suzy!

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Thanks so much for commenting!