Wednesday, 15 July 2015

Gaff

A gaff can be either one of two horrible sounding fishing implements, or a slang term for a person's home. Gaff can also mean a plan or secret, most often used in the phrase 'don't blow the gaff' which is similar to not letting the cat out of the bag. (English is fun, isn't it?)

Don't make the gaffe of adding an e - that's a different word.

Threave castle was once the gaff of Archibald the grim. (Upsetting him was way more than a gaffe)

I wonder if he used a gaff to catch fish in his moat?

12 comments:

  1. Great pic as ever, Patsy. What a horrible word. Even though I know it from my childhood, I can't remember ever saying it. Hope all is well.

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  2. Didn't know it could be used for a home! Great photo.

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    1. That's the meaning I most associate it with, Rosemary. A regional difference perhaps?

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  3. I need a cool pen name like Archibald the Grim. Have to work on that.

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  4. Was there an elevator for Alexander to use? Probably not, that's why he was grim?

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    1. Just stone stairs, Oscar - and people trying to kill him. Maybe the grimness was justified.

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  5. On the other hand a 'gaffer' is a football manager.

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    1. Not heard it used in a football context, Charlie but I've come across gaffer to mean boss which I suppose is much the same thing.

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  6. I'm more familiar with the 'gaffer' term as meaning the boss, and it's only more recently that I'd heard it as reference to someone's home, so perhaps it does have a strong regional reference. :)

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Thanks so much for commenting!