Friday, 15 July 2016

Double Latin


We're currently touring in the mobile writing retreat. One recent visit was to Lullingstone Roman Villa. The ruins and artefacts were interesting of course, but there was also something which captured my writer's imagination - Latin.

I was aware that some people still studied this language and that Latin terms are used for plant names and mottos (in my last day job I sometimes had to say 'honi soit qui mal y pense').


What I hadn't realised was that so many Latin phrases are still in common use. If you've ever drone on ad naseum  about the dramatis personae acting on an ad hoc or de facto basis, inhabiting terra firma, et cetera in your magnum opus, then you were speaking Latin!

21 comments:

  1. Hi Patsy - I'd like to see Lullingstone - it was one of the Castles in my A-Z series ... and Latin is all over the place ... the language has lasted ... cheers Hilary

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  2. My father used to explain new words to us by giving their derivations, which were often Latin, so although I didn't study Latin I kind of know quite a lot!

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    1. I can see how you'd have picked some up, Liz.

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  3. Latin terms are used by lawyers a lot to point out errors [sic] and to indicate that exact quotation is being made, without reference to its correctness (as my dictionary says). I can't believe they are still digging up villas and relics after all these years.

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    1. So they are, Oscar - hadn't thought of that.

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  4. Took two years in high school. I have no idea why. Really. Why did I do that?

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    1. I suppose it seemed like a good idea at the time, Mac.

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  5. I was made to study Latin at school, and then again in my first year at university... but then I am older than you. My daughter's friend teaches Latin and Greek NOW. I hated it at the time. I thought then, and I still think now, that learning a dead language is a waste of time, even though it may help you understand English words and sentence construction.

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    1. It doesn't seem to be entirely dead, Rosemary - but if I were to study a language I'd like it to be one I could converse in.

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  6. Non compos mantis popped into my head. But there again, I am not of sound mind!

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    1. Does compis mantis mean something is praying on your mind, Maggie?

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  7. Logical fallacies all seem to have Latin names. When you attack the person rather than the argument, that's ad hominim - to the man. Although when you look at the treatment of people like Anita Sarkesian and Hillary Clinton I think ad feminim would be more accurate.

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    1. Women do seem to come in for that more than men, Sheila - her clothes, hair, make-up and weight can all count against her far more than what she does.

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  8. I'll just say nunc coepi.. right , now I begin. Love the latin - don't know much , mostly only church latin. Love the idea of a mobile writing retreat... Fascinating...

    gramswisewords.blogspot.com.

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    1. I hadn't even thought of church Latin, Marian! It's obvious now you've mentioned it.

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  9. I didn't appreciate how much of our language is Latin based until I started learning how to speak Spanish. Glad you're enjoying your mobile writing retreat!

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Thanks so much for commenting!