Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Smir

Another Scottish word I've learned on my travels is smirs, which was taught to me by Dawn Brown (who also introduced me to some jolly good home baking). According to the dictionary, smir (or smirs, or even smirrs) is a form of light drizzle. Dawn tells me 'it's down from dreich, but up from scotch mist'.

It was smirring when we visited Crichton Castle. After it had smirred, the sun came out for us at Melrose Abbey.





8 comments:

Blogoratti said...

We learn something new everyday. Thanks for sharing and warm greetings to you!

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...

we don't get many smirs in Florida. . .mostly downpours that can drown you.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Fascinating word ... I have enough trouble with English and some Cornish and now Cockney ... I'll stick down here ... but fun to read about - cheers Hilary

klahanie said...

I think my brain, instead of having a brainstorm, is having a light drizzle aka smir.

Gary.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Yes, we call it smirry rain at times and it exactly describes it!

oscar case said...

By golly, it's been smirring in Phoenix off and on. Nice word, nice photos.

Maggie May said...

A smirry rain smears the windscreen. There must be a connection?

Carolb said...

I don't mind a smir, sadly it's been a bit heavier than that recently.

But it's always good to learn a new word, and sounds much better than light drizzle. :-)