Wednesday, 13 December 2017

Salacin

Salacin is a bitter substance with analgesic properties, which can be obtained from willow bark.

The trunk you can see at the right of this picture is our willow. If you'd like some salacin, please come round and help yourself to a branch as it could do with pruning.

18 comments:

Teresa Ashby said...

I knew that willow bark produced a painkiller, but didn't know what it was called until now :-)

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...

Ill bring my chainsaw

liz young said...

You are a fund of information, Patsy. Loved your drabble story too!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Patsy - willows have all kinds of uses ... now an analgesic could be useful over the Christmas season ... I'm sure it'll get its prune in good time - cheers Hilary

Frances Garrood said...

It's aspirin, Patsy. Trust me, I'm a nurse (though not a horticulturist).

Susan A Eames said...

You've taught me another new word!
I looked it up after reading Frances's post.
Quote: a precursor of salicylic acid, contained in the bark of the willow and poplar, that is responsible for the antiinflammatory and antipyretic effects of willow bark.
So there you have it!

Susan A Eames at
Travel, Fiction and Photos

klahanie said...

Thank you for another informative, rather treemendous posting, Patsy.

Gary

Rosemary Johnson said...

Is willow where you get St John's Wort from? That's used to treat depression.

Patsy said...

I'm not sure the extra detail will be of any use, Teresa, but you never know.

Patsy said...

That'll do the trick, Mac.

Patsy said...

Thanks, Liz.

Patsy said...

I'm sure it must be a good time for painkiller sales, Hilary.

Patsy said...

I thought aspirin was the artificially produced version of salacin, Frances?

Patsy said...

Thanks, Susan. I hadn't realised it was anti inflammatory too.

Patsy said...

I like to leaf my readers better informed, Gary!

Patsy said...

St John's Wort is a different plant, Rosemary (Hypericum)

debi o'neille said...

So, if I get any inflammation I could just eat a chunk of willow bark? , t
Hmmm. Maybe...but no. But I do love willow trees for their beauty. Lucky you to have one. :-)

Patsy said...

In theory you could, Debi. I'm not sure how many twigs would be the correct dosage though.

Yes, I'm lucky to have the tree and a garden to keep it in.