Wednesday, 30 September 2015

Rich

Rich means having lots of money, or other items of value. It can mean splendid, costly or elaborate eg richly decorated or patterned. Alternatively it's used to describe abundance. eg My mind contains a rich supply of story ideas.

Soil which is rich contains plenty of nutrients and is very fertile. Richness in our own food comes from fat or spices. Engines can have too rich a fuel and air mix.

Sounds, scents and colours are often described as rich when they're heavy, full or deep.

The phrase that's rich is sometimes used to convey the idea something is considered outrageous, ludicrous or extremely amusing.

Do you have any riches?

Tuesday, 29 September 2015

Fattening up

No not me (like I'd tell you anyway) I'm referring to my article in the November issue of Writing Magazine, which will be in the shops any day now.

As well as my, not entirely serious, piece there's lots of good advice in this issue, especially for those who're considering trying NaNo.

There are loads of writing competitions listed too.

Wednesday, 23 September 2015

Idyll

An idyll is a simple, happy and peaceful situation or period of time, or picturesque scene or incident. Often they're rustic, rural or romantic (or all three). It can also mean a poem or other artwork which describes something so idyllic. Some of the places we visit with our van are idyllically suited to my becoming an idyllist.

Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Brand new

OK, brand new is a phrase and not a word and this may be more of a rant than an explanation*, but this has been bothering me for a while ... Why do people (particularly those in marketing) say something is brand new? The only definition I've been able to find is 'completely new'. But new is like pregnant, dead or unique - either you are or you're not. You can't be slightly pregnant or fairly unique and an object can't be just a little bit new.

While I'm ranting, semi-naked is just as bad. There's no such thing. A person may not be wearing many clothes, but saying someone who's removed their shirt is semi-naked is like referring to someone as mildly dead. (Unlike the people who built the spynx who are really, totally and absolutely completely dead)

Are there any redundant or illogical expressions which annoy you?

*See the comments for that.

Monday, 14 September 2015

Purple pumpkin

This site has a monthly short story competition with varying word counts and a different word of phrase to be incorporated. There's a €10 prize, plus the winner and their story will be feature on the website and on social media.

The word count for September is 900 and the key word is chocolate. I don't grow pumpkins and I've eaten all the chocolate, but I can always do purple. These are autumn crocus.

Purple Pumkin are also open to a wide variety of book submissions.

Thursday, 10 September 2015

Uncommon wealth

The top prize for the Commonwealth writers competition is £5,000. There are also five regional prizes of £2,500.

To enter you'll need to submit an unpublished short story of 2 to 5,000 words by 1st November - and be a citizen of a commonwealth country.


Wednesday, 9 September 2015

Travail

Travail, or travails, is a situation involving a lot of hard work or difficulty. Eg the travails of book promotion. Apparently just bunging up a link and hoping people will buy it isn't enough. (But I'm going to try that anyway.)

Here's where you can buy my book!

Travels is something different altogether - I hope if you have any trips planned they don't involve any travail.